Skip to main content

About your Search

English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
it to their advantage in states like illinois. california is a whole different story where you have an independent commission drawing the lines there. it really will dramatically shape control of congress. >> i was simply going to make the point about illinois. the viewers don't think it's only the republicans who are redrawing districts. democrats did the exact same thing in illinois, and we'll see what the results are. sometimes they draw districts expecting a certain outcome and the voters surprise them. >> brown: while we're talking about the how, because earlier we talked about the senate in a kind of bigger picture. stu, remind us about the house situation. >> all 435 seats are up in the house but not all 435 are competitive. only about 70 or so are really worth watching for the chance of one party to steal a seat from the other party. the democrats need 25 seats in order toigate majority and presumably reinstall california, nancy pelosi as speaker be as she once was. that seems unlikely. the democrats have said we have enough seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington,
jersey as cokie pointed out but also places like california which are states that he would have won anyway but there was so much organic enthusiasm for barack obama in 2008 that he won -- that a lot of people turned out even in deep blue states where their votes, of course, didn't count, they turned out in mass numbers. the president's people knee this year that's not going to happen. so in terms of the overall national popular vote, if you think about red states and blue states where neither campaign is trying to turn out the vote, the blue states like california and new york for various reasons the president's numbers won't be anywhere near as strong as they were in 2008 whereas in the deep red state there is's so much antipathy towards the president that people will turn out in those states even though they are deep red states. they'll turn out the cast a symbolic vote against barack obama. so that's one thing that skews the popular vote by conceivably on election day towards romney more than people are necessarily expecting >> i think that's absolutely right. the red states are
's its interaction of both of those things with voters. 1978 it was proposition 13 in california, which had to do with reducing state services, and an effort to reduce the size of government, and reduce taxes. that was two years before ronald reagan won the presidency. in a way it forshadowed that. but the most interesting thing about leadership is leadership can't come from the top. it has to be in response to people at the grass roots, and it's this interchange between the two that's so fascinating and works in the american system when it's working at its best. >> woodruff: we're seeing mark shield showing me there's a report in maryland, where they're still counting the votes, but it looks as if the gay marriage initiative there i? >> 51.5% for with 84% of the vote in. >> woodruff: we can also report-- and i'm reading this from the associated press wires, that even though-- well, whatever happens with paul ryan-- and it does appear he was not successful in his bid to become vice president-- he has been apparently re-elected as a congressman from the state of wisconsin. that's somethi
. >> well, there's the senate race that everyone was looking at. there was one in california that we don't have results in yet. >> and we had tom lee survive his challenge against leonard bosswell in iowa. that was an interesting race because you knew they were going to be drawn in the same distance for a year and a half and it was f memb ofer congress.howeverer >> the district favored democratic -- democrat bosworth by latham is one of his closest friends with john boehner >> well, there are all sorts of numbers to look at and we're alternating between showing everyone those numbers and showing the crowd and chicago which looked -- is it looking at itself on the stage? i can't tell what's happened there oh, there's a crowd backstage, too. the for a while it looked like there was a -- oh, there is a crowd on the stage. so it may not be a million plus from grant park but it looks like a full house and they are -- they're patient. it's now been two hours and 15 minutes. impatient and polite. >> and we get the few moments for those of you who might be tuning in and out we did hear a concess
. history in the polls would indicate that, for example, california will go to the democrats and texas to the republicans. which means the outcome of this election will actually be decided in just a handful of states. this has been the most extensive and expensive election in history. the romney campaign has probably done all it can to secure victory. now america must decide if he's the right man to lead the country. >> for more on how this race is shaping up in these very final hours, i'm joined by jim gilmore. he's the former republican governor of virginia and nia who served in the clinton and obama administrations. governor, let me start with you. virginia, i have to ask you, how is it looking for mitt romney? >> he looks very good for mitt romney. i think he's quite likely to carry virginia. but it's very close. so a lot depends upon how things turn out tomorrow, who's excited about going to vote. but it looks like romney's going to carry virginia. >> we'll be watching your state tomorrow night but let me ask you this. if you look at the state of the american economy and you look
in california, even in hawaii, even in most liberal places have had chance to vote they said we want marriage to be between man and woman. the polling on this it always ends up being larger majority for those favoring traditional marriage on the actual election day than what the polls normally show. if it's a dead heat in places like maine right now, my guess is, marriage is going to win. >> remember when and if the supreme court gets this case it is likely to go off on constitutional grounds. think for a moment. whether you want to vote on most of what the constitution today allows or prohibits. i'm not surprised. particularly i'm not surprised because almost all of these referenda came on very early before you saw the transformation we now see in the voting public. they came on who put them on. those who were always against same sex marriage. the people are only catching up to them now, i concede that this is one of the great transformations, issues of all times. it's not going to happen in one fell swoop but it is happening. >> i just think the country is divided. it's a very sensitive and
and destroy fewer communities and fewer lives that way. >> california just took steps to weaken their three strikes and you're out policy. that's a step in the right direction. >> and you also have folks on both sides of the political aisle who are making progress on that. >> but in terms of washington politics it looks to me as if all the blood, sweat and tears of this campaign, all those billions of dollars ended up with the status quo. the republican leadership in washington said the day after the election, "no new revenue, no new taxes." and many conservative activists are not yielding an inch despite the election results. let me play for you an excerpt from a video that was put out by one of the leading conservative activists at the heritage foundation which is sort of the granddaddy of conservative think tanks. >> president obama's re-election is a devastating blow. but it's not a decisive defeat. we are in a war. we're in a war to save this nation. and abandoning our post will condemn it to a future of managed decline. to win this war we must remain committed to fighting president ob
and in the midst of the california wildfires six years ago, for the first time you saw private firefighters showing up at people's homes, spraying them with fire retardant, so when the fire came this mansion would be standing and the next one might burn to the ground. this is extraordinary because we would tend to think of fire fighting, this is definitely a public good and definitely something that people get equally and now we're finding that even -- there's even a two-tiering of protection from wildfires. >> if there was even a short-lived airline in florida, i read about, that offered five-star evacuation service in the events of hurricane. >> yea, after hurricane katrina a company in florida saw a market opportunity and they decided to offer a charter airline that would turn your hurricane into a luxury vacation. that was actually the slogan. they would let you know a hurricane was headed to your area. they would pick you up in a limousine and drive you to the airport and they would make you five-star hotel reservations at the destination of your choice. why does a hurricane have to be bad new
the empire state building, seven killed at a university in oakland, california, seven dead at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. 12 killed and dozens more wound at a move yee these per in aurora, colorado. and then there was this. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the -- >> congresswoman gabby giffords leading the democratic national convention in the pledge of allegiance some 20 months after she was shot in the head in arizona. >> with liberty and justice for all. (cheers and applause) >> there was one brief exchange during the second debate about gun violence. >> i also share your belief that weapons that were designed for soldiers in war theatres don't belong on our streets. >> i'm not in favor of new pieces of legislation on guns and taking guns away or making certain guns illegal. >> reporter: but during three hours of debates devoted to domestic matters the phrase "gun control" was never mentioned, not even by the democratic incumbent. >> you'll find the rest of that segment >> brown: you'll find the rest of that segment and much more on our
. that gets destroyed by guerrillas. they move back to california, poverty again. they build it back up. they move back to salt lake city. they build it back up. romney's whole history of a family is that they knocked us down, we built it back up. we didn't make a fortune; we made a bunch of fortunes. and they resented us for our success, but we kept coming back. that's romney's history. >> with someone with a name with romney you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they've done that you feel like, well, it's my turn now; i've got to pick up the baton and run with it. >> narrator: but mitt and his family rarely tell the story to outsiders. >> it's an incredible history. he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. and so if the core of your personality is something you can't talk about because it's politically unacceptable, well, you're not going to be open with the people all around you. >> narrator: now the church was sending mitt away to spend two and half years on a mission in france. >> as mitt romney has said, imagine going to bordeaux
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)